We looked for domains that reflected what we wanted to project to readers. Happy, healthy, energized, etc. However, most domains that sound like they have to do with weight loss are taken, as are most domains that have anything to do with family. I started playing around with Shakespeare quotes or combination words. Lisa thought that Shakespeare was a little much, but she eventually liked Satisfamily because it projects an image of being satisfied, or having enough.

teach

So here's the deal on this website: we try to provide good, accurate information and opinions for you. In order for this to be worth our while, we put ads on the site. If you like what you read, please consider clicking on the links once in a while.

When I started populating the website, I realized that there was some alliteration happening: lots of Rs. Of course, I had to try hard to make some work, but they R pretty much what we R concerned with in trying to be content in our lives. Seven Rs might be more of a holy number or something, but eight is enough. 

When I looked up these types of highways, I got several names for them. They're the roads that normally bypass the main downtown off of a major interstate highway. In my mind, a beltway cuts across the middle (like a belt), but it's what the I-295 is often called in Jacksonville. Anyhow, naming of the actual auxiliary roads aside, my idea for renaming is more about the directions used in identifying where someone is located along this road. After five years, I still get confused as to where I am when in Jacksonville based on the directional naming along the 295. It can be westbound, eastbound, northbound, or southbound along the West 295, East 295, North 295, or South 295. It's a circle around the city that goes both ways around, and it seems that the current way of naming it (and all other similar bypasses) is wrong. 

Here's an excerpt from my original article about this subject on NewJaxWitty

The key is identifying initial actual direction AND future directions. By adding three directions to the name of the bypass at any given point,  drivers will be able to know precisely where they are AND where they are headed (without thinking too hard).  The same 295 westbound (counterclockwise) near Jacksonville's airport as above would be called 295 wsE.  In fact, the current naming calls one direction northbound and the other southbound near the airport (north side of town) and near Orange Park (south end of Jax). But both roads really go south from the airport and north from Orange Park. Circular roads need different naming than straight roads.

The solution I came up with after at least an hour of thinking about it was to have three directional attributes to any point in the bypass and then an indicator as to when the road hits the main interstate again. If you're getting on the road on the south side of town, but the bypass is heading slightly south before it heads east to meet the main interstate and then heads north, you'd be on I-295 sEn. If you get on the same road/direction much closer to the 95, and it heads east to connect, then north, and then west to connect again on the north side of town, then you'd be on I-295 EnW. At the exact same point, going the other direction, you'd be on I-295 wnE. The capital letters indicate when you intersect with the 95, but all three directions are important in determining where you are along the bypass. 

At the actual interchange with the 95, you'd be going 295 wsE or 295 esW (from the north side of town). And it would be 295 enW or 295 wnE from the south. It also works with such half-assed bypasses as the 280 in Davenport, only you will not need all of the directions, and it may not be any different than the current setup in some of these places. From east heading west, you'd take 280 wN to get past all the heavy Davenport traffic. Later, you'd take 280 N along the same route. Going the other way, you'd be on the 280 sE and later just 280 E. It's not a circle, but the same indicators can be used to keep it consistent.